The IBS Strategy | Blue Heron Health News

Product Name: The IBS Strategy | Blue Heron Health News

Click here to get The IBS Strategy | Blue Heron Health News at discounted price while it’s still available…

All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors.

The IBS Strategy | Blue Heron Health News is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to the address given inside the product and we will immediately refund your entire purchase price, with no questions asked.

Read more

My Mom’s Hands Look So Young Because of These Weird Gloves–And They’re 35% Off at Nordstrom 



My mom and the Nordstrom Anniversary Sale have the secret to younger-looking hands.

The Nordstrom Anniversary Sale kicks off today, July 20, and runs until August 5, and I'm sure you have a lot of beauty products, clothes, shoes, and the like on your list of priorities. As an eagle-eyed sentinel of the internet, I do have to point out one product that might jump to the top of your list for its anti-aging benefits–specifically, how it can help your hands look younger.

For months now, my mom has called me while I'm at work to tell me about these "amazing gloves" she wears driving to keep her hands from getting burned by the sun. For all of those months, I have "uh-huhed" her off the phone–but the truth is, I should be listening to her advice.

The woman looks much younger than the Medicaid-eligible years she's tallied up here on earth, and you'd never guess she's holding a newly-minted senior citizen train pass in those smooth, wrinkle-less hands of hers.

She's the prototypical sun-fearing woman, and it's a mentality (phobia, maybe) that's helped her look so much younger than you'd think as she's gotten older. For one, I'd be shocked, floored, astounded, to find out she's gone a day in her life without SPF 30 lathered on every inch of her body–even what's covered by her clothes. In fact, I would consider it one of her hobbies to double layer sun protection, and she's often spotted around town sporting a little neckerchief along with a hat, sunglasses, and a very strange pair of fingerless gloves.

What are these Band-Aid colored hand accoutrements, you ask? Oh, those are just her Skin Rejuvenating Gloves, which you can get yourself during the Nordstrom Anniversary Sale for 35% off. Not technically a sun-protecting agent, Illuminage's set ($29; nordstrom.com) actually works to fight wrinkles and age spots on your hands while you're wearing them. They turn back the marks of time, improving your hands' overall texture and tone with patented Copper Technology in as soon as four weeks. You can wear them whenever (my mom recommends daytime because #BlockTheSun), and they'll last for more than 100 washes.

I know I haven't told you outright my mom's age (I'm not allowed), but all you need to know is: These bizarre gloves are strangely effective when it comes to making your hands look younger, as demonstrated by someone who–hint hint–saw Jimi Hendrix in concert as a teenager.



Source link

Food Crisis No Problem – How to Prosper in Food During a Food Shortage

Product Name: Food Crisis No Problem – How to Prosper in Food During a Food Shortage

Click here to get Food Crisis No Problem – How to Prosper in Food During a Food Shortage at discounted price while it’s still available…

All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors.

Food Crisis No Problem – How to Prosper in Food During a Food Shortage is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to the address given inside the product and we will immediately refund your entire purchase price, with no questions asked.

Read more

6 Things You Secretly Want to Know About Open Relationships



From a young age, we're led to believe that a healthy relationship means two people in a serious, long-term, monogamous commitment.

Sure, that type of coupling is still the majority. But it sure seems like an increasing number of people are coming out as part of an open relationship. One study published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy found that 20% of Americans are or have been in a "consensual non-monogamous relationship" at some point in life.

RELATED: You'd Never Know by Looking at Me, but I'm in an Open Marriage

What does the term mean, exactly? Every couple has their own ground rules and navigates them differently. But here's a broad definition. “Open relationships are any form of sexual or romantic relationship that does not require exclusivity," says Liz Powell, PsyD, author of Building Open Relationships. "I like to think of non-monogamy as expanding from a set, limited menu to a buffer of options." 

The idea of being part of a romantic pair yet opening your bedroom to others is a hard concept for many of us to wrap our heads around. The logistics seem tricky. Does the one partner get to approve who the other sleeps with? Are these dalliances just one-time hookups or ongoing affairs? What about jealousy? To get a sense of what goes on, we asked people (most of whom asked us to change their names) who are happily in an open relationship to tell us how they work.

An open relationship is not all about sex

There’s a common misconception that the reason someone would want to open their relationship and potentially have multiple intimate partners is because one (or both) primary partners need more sex, more sexual partners, or more of a certain type of sex to feel sexually satisfied. But that’s not necessarily the case.

“People assume that because I have had many partners in my life at once, I must have a high sex drive or am not getting enough from just one partner," says George.* "That couldn't be further than the truth. I am not a very sexual person, and if anything I am sometimes grateful to have multiple partners so that I don't feel pressured [by one person] to have sex all the time. It's easier for me to say I'm not in the mood when I know my partner has another option."

RELATED: What Pink, Scarlett Johansson, and Other Stars Really Think of Monogamy

Also, having an open relationship hardly means that you're taking advantage of the option. “Just because the non-monogamy door is open doesn’t mean it’s blown off its hinges,” says Jade. “It’s been over a year since I had relations aside from with my husband; I just haven’t been in the mood. But I like knowing that option is there for me if I need it."

Yes, jealousy happens

“The first questions I always get asked have to do with being jealous,” says Devon Day, when people find out she's in an open relationship. “Yes, sometimes I do. In my opinion, it’s normal to feel jealous; it doesn’t mean something is wrong with you or that you’re failing at non-monogamy. Having a successful non-monogamous relationship isn’t about being immune to jealousy, it’s learning how to work through it and communicating."

It's worth mentioning that a 2017 study in Perspectives on Psychological Science found that people in open relationships reported more trust and less jealousy than did monogamous partners. The researchers suggest that a non-monogamous coupling teaches partners how to handle jealousy in a healthier way.

RELATED: 7 Sexual Fantasies It's Totally Normal to Have

People in open relationships are committed

“The most common misconception I hear is that we don’t want to commit,” says Jade. “But I’m married to my partner…I’d say that’s pretty committed!”

She’s not the only one who takes issue with the commitment-phobe assumption. “My relationship is the most committed one I’ve ever been in, and we’re 100% open," says Sam. "It’s because I feel so committed to building an open relationship that we’re able to feel close and trusting in the midst of the other connections around us. We knew when we started dating that we wanted to be together, but we also wanted space to grow and explore with others. Five years ago we decided that, and we’re still together."

Open relationships "can be just as committal or non-committal as monogamous ones," echoes George. "I don't want to say having an open relationship requires more commitment than monogamy, but it certainly does require an entirely new set of difficult conversations for two people to overcome."

Marriages can be open, too

“I’m in an open marriage,” Jade reiterates. “We were in an open relationship, and then we got married and our relationship became an open marriage. And it works great for us.”

Of course, not everyone in an open relationship is also open to marriage. “How could I choose just one of [my] partners to become legally married to, or to have my health insurance, or to have visitation rights? There are a few other reasons why my partners and I are not interested in marriage for ourselves, but of course we fully support the happiness of other people,” says George.

RELATED: 8 Women Share the Foreplay Moves That Always Get Them in the Mood

All open relationships have their own rules

“I've seen open relationships defined as serious, committed relationships with multiple people, to three-plus people in a relationship, to couples that are primary partners but casually date outside the relationship, to open couples who only do casual sex outside of their relationship and nothing more," says Taz. "How you define an open relationship and the rules of any open relationship will depend on who's in them, and no two will be exactly the same, because the folks in them will have different boundaries, needs, and comfort levels."


“Open relationships look as different as any closed relationship. Sometimes there are more rules, sometimes there are none,” says Sam. Adds Holly: “My relationship is sexually open but emotionally very much exclusive.” Others may be in an open relationship that is open sexually and romantically. Every couple has to find what works for them.

RELATED: Real Women Share Their Go-To Masturbation Techniques

You'd never know if a friend or neighbor is in an open relationship

Open relationships have existed throughout history. But most cultures don't accept the concept, and many have outright disdain for people who choose to be in one. A fear of being ostracized by friends, family, and community is a powerful reason someone may not publicize the status of their relationship. Which means that someone close to you may be in an open relationship, and you're none the wiser.

“We definitely share our relationship 'type' on a need-to-know basis, and most people don’t need to know. [My husband's] friends and our families [don't] know, but most of my friends know," says Jade. "We reveal it only when we’re comfortable with someone and have a good enough sense of whether they can handle it or not. I have friends who can’t really handle it because it just goes against everything our culture tells us about what sexuality and love is. And that’s okay."

Adds Holly: “The fact that my relationship is open isn’t a secret, it’s just something a lot of people wouldn’t understand and I have no interest in explaining myself or hearing ignorant comments. I’m all for teaching people, but I’m not the poster child. My relationship works for me, and I can’t imagine being in any other type of relationship."

*Names have been changed



Source link

  • Uncategorized

301 Moved Permanently

Product Name: 301 Moved Permanently

Click here to get 301 Moved Permanently at discounted price while it’s still available…

All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors.

301 Moved Permanently is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to the address given inside the product and we will immediately refund your entire purchase price, with no questions asked.

Read more

Does Noisy Eating and Loud Gum Chewing Drive You Crazy? You May Have Misophonia



If every loud crunch of cereal or hair-tingling slurp of soup makes you want to scream, you may have a real neurological condition — and you’re not alone.

The technical term for the condition is misophonia, and it’s defined as a severe sensitivity to sounds like chewing, coughing, yawning and more. Some people have more extreme cases of misophonia than others, and find themselves completely distracted by the noises, to the point where they need cognitive behavioral therapy.

While it was formally named as a condition in 2001, many skeptics still questioned whether misophonia was a real condition. But last year, a study published in the journal Current Biology showed that those with the disorder have a difference in their brain’s frontal lobe that causes an intense reaction to noise, and can even lead to a faster heart rate and sweating.

“I hope this will reassure sufferers,” Tim Griffiths, Professor of Cognitive Neurology at Newcastle University and University College London, said in a press release. “I was part of the skeptical community myself until we saw patients in the clinic and understood how strikingly similar the features are.”

And in February, another study found that having misophonia can impact people’s ability to learn.

According to the study, published in the journal Applied Cognitive Psycology, a noise as subtle as gum chewing is enough to impact academic performance.

“Some people are especially sensitive to relatively subtle specific background sounds like chewing, and this sensitivity can be distracting enough to impair learning,” study co-author Logan Fiorella, an assistant professor of applied cognition and development at the University of Georgia, told TIME.

The researchers had 72 college students study papers on migraines, with half sitting in a room with a person chewing gum, and the others without. They all then took a test on the material in silence, and those with the gum-chewer had lower test scores.

Fiorella noted that none of the students had clinically severe misophonia, but were still impacted by the noise.

“It may be especially important for students with higher levels of misophonia sensitivity to avoid studying in places where there are a lot of ‘trigger’ sounds, such as other people chewing, coughing, clicking pens, or rustling papers,” Fiorella said. “When that’s unavoidable, some strategies suggested by other researchers include using earplugs, focusing on one’s own sounds, or using positive internal dialogue.”



Source link